Acoustical Performance Charlotte NC

To understand why some building spaces are acoustically better than others--and specifically how masonry in Charlotte can be used to limit or enhance sound transmission--designers must first understand how sound is transmitted from one building space to another.

J.G. Coram Company, Inc
(704) 900-7615
1617 Elizabeth Avenue
Charlotte, NC
 
Hunter Roberts Construction Group, LLC
(980) 233-6800
227 West Trade Street Suite 650
Charlotte, NC
 
Clark Patterson Lee
(704) 331-9131
301 East Ninth Street Suite 180
Charlotte, NC
 
Perkins+Will
(704) 972-5600
1100 South Tryon St
Charlotte, NC
 
SFCS, Inc.
(704) 372-7327
101 West Worthington Avenue
Charlotte, NC
 
Edward H. Springs Interiors, Inc
(704) 376-6461
1236 East Morehead Street
Charlotte, NC
 
BJAC
(704) 602-0071
2108 South Boulevard Suite 205
Charlotte, NC
 
AAA ARROW DISPOSAL INC.
(704) 467-7744
1513 east more head rd
charlotte, NC
 
LS3P ASSOCIATES LTD
(704) 333-6686
227 West Trade Street
Charlotte, NC
 
Alfred Williams & Co
(704) 338-9373
505 South Cedar Street
Charlotte, NC
 

Acoustical Performance

Provided By:

Source: Masonry Construction
Publication date: October 1, 1995

By Christine A. Subasic

Abstract: To understand why some building spaces are acoustically better than others--and specifically how masonry can be used to limit or enhance sound transmission--designers must first understand how sound is transmitted from one building space to another. When sound strikes a wall, some of it is reflected, some absorbed, and some transmitted, depending on the materials and construction of the wall assembly. Acoustic performance of a wall assembly is characterized by either an STC (sound transmission class) rating or an NRC (noise reduction coefficient) rating. The STC of a wall assembly is a measure of its resistance to sound transmission or its ability to insulate a building space from sound on the opposite side. The NRC characterizes an assembly's ability to absorb sound. Sound absorption is important in determining how sound travels within a building space. In many cases where masonry is used for ease of maintenance and other reasons, acoustical performance also is a concern. Although acoustical characteristics may be overlooked as a particular advantage, the use of masonry walls in restrooms, kitchens, hallways, and other high-noise areas insulates surrounding spaces from unwanted noise.

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