Acoustical Performance Fayetteville NC

To understand why some building spaces are acoustically better than others--and specifically how masonry in Fayetteville can be used to limit or enhance sound transmission--designers must first understand how sound is transmitted from one building space to another.

Highland Construction
(910) 485-6738
1409 Clinton Rd
Fayetteville, NC
 
Custom Edge
(910) 308-1399
2766 George Owen Road
Fayetteville, NC
 
Veterans Home Improvement
(910) 988-0136
4640 Keg Court
Fayetteville, NC
 
Bullard Construction
(910) 977-0747
6801 Wimbledon Circle
Fayetteville, NC
 
Casey Services Hvac, Inc.
(919) 556-3338
4900 Purnell Road
Wake Forest, NC

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Showcase Construction Co.
(910) 864-0247
5506 Yadkin Road
Fayetteville, NC
 
Curbing Creations
(910) 728-8292
6835 Raeford Rd
Fayetteville, NC
 
McKee Homes
(910) 475-7100
120 Nandina Court
Fayetteville, NC
 
D & D Decocurb
(910) 224-2024
109 Inlet Drive
Raeford, NC
 
Wayne Brothers Inc
(704) 938-8400
195 Ervin Woods Dr
Kannapolis, NC

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Acoustical Performance

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Source: Masonry Construction
Publication date: October 1, 1995

By Christine A. Subasic

Abstract: To understand why some building spaces are acoustically better than others--and specifically how masonry can be used to limit or enhance sound transmission--designers must first understand how sound is transmitted from one building space to another. When sound strikes a wall, some of it is reflected, some absorbed, and some transmitted, depending on the materials and construction of the wall assembly. Acoustic performance of a wall assembly is characterized by either an STC (sound transmission class) rating or an NRC (noise reduction coefficient) rating. The STC of a wall assembly is a measure of its resistance to sound transmission or its ability to insulate a building space from sound on the opposite side. The NRC characterizes an assembly's ability to absorb sound. Sound absorption is important in determining how sound travels within a building space. In many cases where masonry is used for ease of maintenance and other reasons, acoustical performance also is a concern. Although acoustical characteristics may be overlooked as a particular advantage, the use of masonry walls in restrooms, kitchens, hallways, and other high-noise areas insulates surrounding spaces from unwanted noise.

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