Anatomy Lessons Through Yoga Camp Lejeune NC

As yoga teachers, we have a wonderful opportunity to help yoga students learn about their bodies and how all the separate bones, joints, and muscles work together in harmony to create yoga poses.

The Gypsy Sun
(910) 328-0328
206 N. Topsail Drive
Topsail Island, NC
 
Stress Escape Tours
(585) 975-9625
16 Murdock Ave
Asheville, NC

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Breathing Space
(910) 977-4476
1404 Raeford Rd.
Fayetteville, NC
Yoga Styles
Kripalu

YogaMoxie Studio
(704) 232-5014
206 Oak Avenue
Kannapolis, NC
Yoga Styles
Vinyasa hatha yoga

Duke Integrative Medicine
(866) 313-0959
DUMC Box 102904
Durham, NC
Yoga Styles
combines the best of several styles

Healing Through Movement
(704) 919-3580
1914 JN Pease Place
CHARLOTTE, NC

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Integral Yoga Studio
(919) 337-0072
206 Redwood Park Drive
Morrisville, NC
Yoga Styles
Integral Yoga

Triangle Yoga
(919) 933-9642
930 Martin Luther King Jr Blvd
Chapel Hill, NC
Yoga Styles
Variety of Styles

Prama Institute
(828) 649-9408
310 Panhandle Road
Marshall, NC
Yoga Styles
Retreat Center

Blissful Body Yoga
(704) 837-7278
3270 Robinwood Road
Gastonia, NC
Yoga Styles
Mixed style combining Kripalu, Iyengar,

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Anatomy Lessons Through Yoga

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By Julie Gudmestad

As yoga teachers, we have a wonderful opportunity to help yoga students learn about their bodies and how all the separate bones, joints, and muscles work together in harmony to create yoga poses. Using the correct anatomical names for body parts can simplify and streamline this process immensely. However, some yoga teachers rarely make anatomical references because it doesn't fit their teaching style, or because they have little training in anatomy. Other teachers clearly enjoy talking about anatomy but don't want to risk students being bored or lost in a technical discussion. By including just a bit of anatomy in each class, it is possible to strike a balance between too much information and none at all. The following suggestions will help clarify your instructions and make them more accessible to your students.

Show and Tell

First, I think it's important to remember that the average yoga student isn't interested in studying anatomy. Don't get me wrong—some people are fascinated by the structure of the body and how it functions in yoga poses. However, most students come to class to do yoga, not to struggle to understand Latin names and complicated muscle interactions. So our challenge as teachers is to use our knowledge of anatomy to help our students deepen their work in a pose and to stimulate their interest in their bodies, without overstimulating their thought processes.

Click here to read full article from Yoga Journal