Attention Training for Stroke Victims Hickory NC

The inability to focus is a common problem for stroke survivors, and a new study finds they might benefit from attention-training.

William Ronald Gardner, MD
(828) 327-9178
3149 Laurel Ridge Rd NW
Hickory, NC
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Miami Sch Of Med, Miami Fl 33101
Graduation Year: 1963
Hospital
Hospital: Frye Reg Med Ctr, Hickory, Nc
Group Practice: Hickory Surgical Clinic

Data Provided by:
Emory Gary Mc Dougal, MD
(828) 322-9105
1771 Tate Blvd SE Ste 101
Hickory, NC
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of South Al Coll Of Med, Mobile Al 36688
Graduation Year: 1977

Data Provided by:
Peter N Purcell
(828) 758-5501
401 Mulberry St Sw Ste 101
Lenoir, NC
Specialty
General Surgery, Vascular Surgery

Data Provided by:
Lemuel Broome Kirby, MD
(828) 213-9090
222 Asheland Ave
Asheville, NC
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ, Winston-Salem Nc 27157
Graduation Year: 1992

Data Provided by:
Charles Wade Jones
(336) 246-7779
200 Hospital Ave
Jefferson, NC
Specialty
General Surgery, Vascular Surgery

Data Provided by:
Peter Holbrook Bradshaw, MD
(828) 327-9178
415 N Center St
Hickory, NC
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Nc At Chapel Hill Sch Of Med, Chapel Hill Nc 27599
Graduation Year: 1982
Hospital
Hospital: Catawba Mem Hosp, Hickory, Nc; Frye Reg Med Ctr, Hickory, Nc
Group Practice: Hickory Surgical Clinic

Data Provided by:
Emory Gary McDougal
(828) 322-9105
1899 Tate Blvd Se
Hickory, NC
Specialty
General Surgery, Vascular Surgery

Data Provided by:
Todd Franklin Early, MD
(336) 621-3777
2704 Henry St
Greensboro, NC
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Eastern Va Med Sch Of The Med Coll Of Hampton Roads, Norfolk Va 23501
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided by:
Bradley R Thomason
(336) 765-5221
2915 Lyndhurst Ave
Winston-Salem, NC
Specialty
General Surgery, Vascular Surgery

Data Provided by:
Janice Radoslovich Hong, MD
(919) 616-4203
10000 Falls of Neuse Rd Ste 303
Raleigh, NC
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Jefferson Med Coll-Thos Jefferson Univ, Philadelphia Pa 19107
Graduation Year: 1994

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Attention Training for Stroke Victims

Provided By:

The inability to focus is a common problem for stroke survivors, and a new study finds they might benefit from attention-training.

New Zealand psychologists evaluated 78 stroke patients who underwent attention process training (APT) and found significant improvement on one test of attention compared to those who had standard stroke therapy, according to a report in the July 23 issue of Stroke.

But the improvement in attention was not accompanied by significant improvements in performance, and no differences were seen in three other tests of attention.

The study is "really important and exciting," said McKay Moore Sohlberg, an associate professor in the department of communication disorders and sciences at the University of Oregon. She and a colleague, Catherine A. Mateer, developed APT in the 1980s when both were at the University of Washington. Mateer, a neuropsychologist, now is at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada. They designed APT for accident victims with brain injuries.

"It's an exciting paper in terms of being a rigorous, controlled trial," Sohlberg said. "There has not been a lot of information available on APT after stroke. The positive results suggest that it might be something that is helpful."

APT is a series of exercises designed to improve cognitive function. "For example, you listen for a particular stimulus, a letter or word, and perform an appropriate response," Sohlberg said. "Different exercises are matched to different problems."

The New Zealand study is "a first step to establish whether people who have strokes can profit from APT," Sohlberg said.

"What we don't know from this paper is how well the results generalize to functional tasks," she said. "Does doing better on cognitive tests translate to a better ability to hold conversations or read? That is the next step, looking at the functional effects of it."

Loss of the ability to focus attention is a major problem for people after a stroke, said Dr. Larry B. Goldstein, director of the Duke University Stroke Center in Durham, N.C. "You can be sitting in a room and something is going on in the hallway and you have no idea of what's going on out there," he said. "Or your left arm is not working well, and you might not even realize that it's your arm."

But the New Zealand study does not establish the value of APT in stroke therapy, Goldstein noted. It is a small and very preliminary study, he said. "It looks like only half the participants completed the therapy. They found some benefit, but no significant changes in quality of life or global level of deficit," Goldstein said.

Nevertheless, the results indicate that use of APT in stroke therapy "is worthy of further research," he said.

More information

Learn about stroke therapy from the National Stroke Association.

Author: By Ed Edelson
HealthDay Reporter

SOURCES: McKay Moore Sohlberg, Ph.D, associate professor, department of communication disorders and sciences, University of Oregon, Portland; Larry A. Goldstein, M.D, director, Duke University Stroke Center, Durham, N.C.; July 23, 2009, Stroke

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com