Basics to Save a Life Greenville NC

Medics and doctors in Greenville are used to participating in a flurry of activity when trying to save a person who's had a cardiac arrest -- inserting IVs, placing a breathing tube, performing defibrillation to restart the heart.

Nazim Uddin Azam Khan, MD
PO Box 8168
Greenville, NC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Khyber Med Coll, Univ Of Peshawar, Peshawar, Pakistan
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided by:
Donald Hugh Tucker, MD
(252) 752-6101
109 Lord Ashley Dr
Greenville, NC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Duke Univ Sch Of Med, Durham Nc 27710
Graduation Year: 1958

Data Provided by:
Michael John Moeller, MD
(252) 816-5887
PCMH T/A 378
Greenville, NC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Suny-Hlth Sci Ctr At Syracuse, Coll Of Med, Syracuse Ny 13210
Graduation Year: 1978

Data Provided by:
Ishtiaque Mohiuiddin, MD
1402 Allegro Ct
Greenville, NC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Michael Kevin Smith, MD
(717) 764-6775
804 Chesapeake Pl
Greenville, NC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Va Commonwealth Univ, Med Coll Of Va Sch Of Med, Richmond Va 23298
Graduation Year: 1998

Data Provided by:
Shekar Pillai Kumar, MD
(252) 744-1429
3 Merry Ln Apt A
Greenville, NC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Stanley Med Coll, Dr M G R Med Univ, Madras, Tn, India
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided by:
Sanjay Chandrakant Patel, MD
(252) 752-6101
301 Campden Way
Greenville, NC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Pecsi Orvostudomanyi Egyetem, Pecs, Hungary
Graduation Year: 1991
Hospital
Hospital: Onslow Memorial Hospital, Jacksonville, Nc
Group Practice: Physicians East Quadrangle Medical Specialists

Data Provided by:
Karen Furlonge Lurito, MD
(252) 816-5601
502 Kensington Dr
Greenville, NC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Md Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21201
Graduation Year: 1996

Data Provided by:
Allen Lewis Oseroff, MD
(252) 728-3000
119 Longmeadow Rd
Greenville, NC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: George Washington Univ Sch Of Med & Hlth Sci, Washington Dc 20037
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided by:
Charlie Joseph Sang Jr, MD
(806) 743-2757
600 Moye Blvd
Greenville, NC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tulane Univ Sch Of Med, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1983

Data Provided by:
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Basics to Save a Life

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SUNDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Medics and doctors are used to participating in a flurry of activity when trying to save a person who's had a cardiac arrest -- inserting IVs, placing a breathing tube, performing defibrillation to restart the heart.

But studies now show that none of those advanced techniques saves lives as well as ordinary cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR. And what's more, those studies have also found that a truncated version of CPR that tosses out mouth-to-mouth in favor of simple and sustained chest compressions increases survival rates dramatically.

"It's been shown to work, while these other things have not been shown to improve survival," said Dr. Alex Garza, an associate professor of emergency medicine at the Washington Hospital Center and Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, D.C. "They were just things we thought would be good."

"The important thing now is to step back, do chest compressions and proceed methodically," he said.

Both the American Red Cross and the American Heart Association have endorsed chest compressions as an acceptable alternative for people who witness a cardiac arrest but aren't trained in CPR.

By simplifying the process, they hope to get more bystanders to step in and perform chest compressions on the ailing person until help arrives. The American Heart Association estimates that fewer than a third of those who suffer cardiac arrest in a public place receive any form of CPR.

Bystanders simply are "worried about making an error, and they forget a lot of the steps," said Dr. Marc Eckstein, associate professor of emergency medicine at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California and medical director of the Los Angeles Fire Department. "Mouth-to-mouth is complex, and many people are reluctant to perform it. Performing compression only, the results are comparable to full CPR -- and you can teach someone to do it in a matter of minutes."

The compressions need to be applied in the center of the chest at a rate of about 100 a minute -- ironically, about the same rhythm as the Bee Gees' song "Stayin' Alive." One study has found that performing chest compressions while listening to that song improved the CPR technique of physicians and medical students.

"Laypersons with no formal training in CPR, when they're presented with someone in cardiac arrest, can do a pretty decent job with chest compressions," Garza said.

Garza and Eckstein go further than the American Red Cross or the American Heart Association, however, saying that even trained rescuers should focus on uninterrupted chest compressions rather than trying to juggle compressions with mouth-to-mouth or other treatments.

It takes many repeated chest compressions to increase pressure enough to begin driving blood into heart tissue, Garza said. "By the time you got to your 15th chest compression, you'd just gotten to where you were doing some good, and then you'd stop to perform mouth-to-mouth, and it went back to zero," he said.

Both doctors have studied what happens when paramedics change their cardiac protocols to focus more on chest compressions, Garza in Kansas City and Eckstein in Los Angeles. They both found that survival rates improved when paramedics delayed intubating patients, administering medications or performing defibrillation in favor of consistent compressions.

Chest compression CPR is more valuable than defibrillation because rescuers often arrive too late for effective defibrillation, which needs to occur within five minutes of cardiac arrest, Garza said.

"The problem is, most paramedics don't arrive in the first five minutes," he said. By the time rescuers arrive, the body's tissues are starved for oxygen and the heart cells are depleted of energy. "If you attempt a defibrillation at that time, it's less likely to be successful," Garza said. "They're more likely to flat-line."

Airports and casinos boast excellent heart attack survival rates "because there's always a defibrillator within a five-minute walk," Garza said. Security guards are trained in the use of defibrillators, and both types of facilities have excellent closed-circuit monitoring.

If defibrillation isn't available, it's best for bystanders to start providing chest compressions, the experts say. That way, the stores of oxygen still in the blood will continue to circulate and feed the body's tissues, keeping the person's body and brain alive.

"When the heart stops, it's not a problem of not having oxygen in the blood," Eckstein said. "It's a pump problem. You have to circulate that oxygen."

More information

The University of Washington School of Medicine has more on CPR.

SOURCES: Alex Garza, M.D., associate professor, emergency medicine, Washington Hospital Center and Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, D.C.; Marc Eckstein, M.D., associate professor, emergency medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, director of pre-hospital care, Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Medical Center, and medical director, Los Angeles Fire Department, Los Angeles; American Red Cross; American Heart Association

Author: By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

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