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Blood Glucose Levels Improved by Cinnamon Consumption Durham NC

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Blood Glucose Levels Improved by Cinnamon Consumption

Cinnamon Consumption May Improve Blood Glucose Levels.
Date: Thursday, May 21, 2009
Source: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Related Monographs: Cinnamon
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Cinnamon is native to Sri Lanka and India and is cultivated in parts of Africa, southeastern India, Indonesia, the Seychelles, South America, Sri Lanka, and the West Indies. Cinnamon is used for culinary and medicinal purposes. In Chinese herbalism, cinnamon is one of the oldest remedies. It has been used in traditional treatment for diarrhea, alleviating pain and discomfort of arthritis, menstrual problems, yeast infections, colds, flu, toothache and digestive problems. Recently, cinnamon is being studied for its effectiveness in treating diabetes, osteoporosis and cancer.

Diabetes can affect people of any age. It increases the risk of chronic, debilitating conditions, including cardiovascular disease, retinopathy and blindness, peripheral neuropathies, vascular insufficiency and amputation, immune deficiencies, skin ulceration and wound healing disturbances, kidney disease and Alzheimer's disease. The discovery of insulin in the early 20th century has afforded much progress in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Diabetes is diagnosed when there is a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) of greater than 126mg/dL, or a two-hour plasma glucose (OGTT - oral glucose tolerance test) of greater than 200mg/dL. There are two forms of diabetes mellitus recognized today: type 1 (formerly referred to as IDDM, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, or juvenile onset) and type 2 (previously called NIDDM, non-insulin dependent diabetes, or adult onset).

Scandinavian researchers conducted a study to test the effect of cinnamon on postprandial (post-meal) blood glucose and the gastric emptying rate in healthy participants. The study included 15 subjects with an average age of 24.5 years, an average BMI of 22.5 and no history of diabetes. The participants were then randomly assigned to consume 300 grams of rice pudding with zero, one or three grams of cinnamon. The results revealed that there were no significant changes in the gastric emptying rate, levels of satiety, and blood glucose levels among the subjects. However, it was found that the insulin response one and two hours after the meal with three grams of cinnamon was significantly lower than levels after consuming the control meal. The researchers concluded that the results appear to indicate a correlation between the amount of cinnamon consumed and a decrease in insulin concentrations.1

1 Hlebowicz J, Hlebowicz A, Lindstedt S, et al. Effects of 1 and 3 g cinnamon on gastric emptying, satiety, and postprandial blood glucose, insulin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, glucagon-like peptide-1, and ghrelin concentrations in healthy subjects. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009:89(3):815-21.

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