Brain Scans of Schizophrenia Raleigh NC

Scanning technology has helped researchers pinpoint the part of the brain that appears to be where psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia begin, a new study says. The research could help doctors diagnose these types of disorders in their early stages and help scientists develop more effective drugs, according to the report in the Sept. 7 issue of the Archives of Psychiatry.

Barbara Gavin Mattox, MD
(617) 626-9507
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Medical School: Univ Of Nc At Chapel Hill Sch Of Med, Chapel Hill Nc 27599
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Anthony Glenn Carraway, MD
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Medical School: Univ Of Nc At Chapel Hill Sch Of Med, Chapel Hill Nc 27599
Graduation Year: 1984

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Susan Louise Eder, MD
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Medical School: A Einstein Coll Of Med Of Yeshiva Univ, Bronx Ny 10461
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Jean Elizabeth Aycock, MD
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Tanya R Cheevers Woods, MD
Raleigh, NC
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Medical School: Meharry Med Coll Sch Of Med, Nashville Tn 37208
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Robert Le Roy Rollins, MD
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Medical School: Duke Univ Sch Of Med, Durham Nc 27710
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Susan Rae Levy, MD
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Medical School: Univ Of Rochester Sch Of Med & Dentistry, Rochester Ny 14642
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Lawrence M Raines III, MD
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859 Washington St
Raleigh, NC
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Medical School: Univ Of Nc At Chapel Hill Sch Of Med, Chapel Hill Nc 27599
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Hospital: University Of North Carolina H, Chapel Hill, Nc
Group Practice: Psychiatric Associates-NC

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Integrative and Spiritual Psychiatry
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223 1/2 Forest Road
Raleigh, NC
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Wellness Training, Psychotherapy, Psychiatry, Nutrition, Mind/Body Medicine, Healthy Aging, Functional Medicine
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American Holistic Medical Association

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Sheldon Chase, MD
(919) 828-9937
859 Washington St
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Medical School: Univ Of Mi Med Sch, Ann Arbor Mi 48109
Graduation Year: 1970

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Brain Scans of Schizophrenia

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WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Scanning technology has helped researchers pinpoint the part of the brain that appears to be where psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia begin, a new study says.

The research could help doctors diagnose these types of disorders in their early stages and help scientists develop more effective drugs, according to the report in the Sept. 7 issue of the Archives of Psychiatry.

In the study, researchers at Columbia University in New York City scanned the brains of 18 people at high risk for psychosis, using a novel high-resolution application of functional MRI technology, an imaging method that tracks which parts of the brain are most active.

Seventy percent of the participants who went on to develop disorders such as schizophrenia had very high activity in a region of the hippocampus known as the CA1 subfield, the study authors found.

"Right now, the odds of knowing who will go on to develop schizophrenia from [early indications] is only a little better than a coin toss," first author Dr. Scott A. Schobel, an assistant professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia University and the New York State Psychiatric Institute, said in a news release. "We're hoping that applying this imaging technique can enhance our knowledge of who might go on to develop schizophrenia and related disorders, since early diagnosis and early intervention are so important."

More information

To learn more about schizophrenia, see the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health.

SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Sept. 7, 2009

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