CLA to Reduce Heart Disease Greensboro NC

Read more about CLA Intake May Reduce Heart Disease.

Edmund Joseph Le Bauer, MD
(336) 547-1752
PO Box 26201
Greensboro, NC
Specialties
Cardiology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Duke Univ Sch Of Med, Durham Nc 27710
Graduation Year: 1960
Hospital
Hospital: Moses H Cone Memorial Hospital, Greensboro, Nc
Group Practice: Lebauer Health Care

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Jeffrey David Katz
(336) 547-1700
1126 N Church St
Greensboro, NC
Specialty
Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease

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Dr.Stanley Tennant
(336) 272-6133
1002 N Church St # 103
Greensboro, NC
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ
Year of Graduation: 1978
Speciality
Cardiologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
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5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

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Henry W. b. Smith
(336) 275-4096
301 E Wendover Ave
Greensboro, NC
Specialty
Cardiology, Internal Medicine

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John Howard Edmunds, MD
(336) 275-4096
301 E Wendover Ave Ste 310
Greensboro, NC
Specialties
Cardiology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Uniformed Services Univ Of The Hlth Sci, Bethesda Md 20814
Graduation Year: 1981
Hospital
Hospital: Moses H Cone Memorial Hospital, Greensboro, Nc; Wesley Long Community Hospital, Greensboro, Nc
Group Practice: Eagle Cardiology

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Ajay S Kadakia
(336) 574-2100
108 E Northwood St
Greensboro, NC
Specialty
Cardiology, Cardiovascular Disease

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Daniel Robert Bensimhon
(336) 547-1752
1126 N Church St
Greensboro, NC
Specialty
Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease

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Philip Joseph Nahser
(336) 272-6133
1002 N Church St
Greensboro, NC
Specialty
Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Brian Sanders Crenshaw, MD
(336) 547-1715
520 N Elam Ave
Greensboro, NC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tn, Memphis, Coll Of Med, Memphis Tn 38163
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided by:
Thomas David Stuckey
(336) 547-1700
1126 N Church St
Greensboro, NC
Specialty
Cardiology, Cardiovascular Disease

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CLA to Reduce Heart Disease

CLA Intake May Reduce Heart Disease.
Date: Thursday, June 11, 2009
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases
Related Monographs: Cardiovascular Disease, Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA)
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Diseases of the heart and circulation are so common and the public is so well acquainted with the major symptoms that result from cardiovascular disorders which patients, and occasionally physicians, wrongly attribute many unrelated complaints to cardiovascular disease (CVD). It should not be a surprise that this occurs since most patients are aware that cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in the United States. There are four principle properties of the cardiovascular system that can be evaluated to provide information to help manage cardiovascular disease. These include movement of electrical signals through the heart, heart pump function, blood flow through the heart, and anatomy.

Bearing a close chemical resemblance to linoleic acid, research indicates that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) may also offer a number of health benefits. These include possible enhancement of immunity, as well as potential protection from cancer and heart disease. CLA may also stimulate growth of muscle tissue while promoting fat loss. Small amounts of CLA occur in most kinds of meat while slightly larger concentrations occur in dairy products. These days, foods that formerly contained substantial amounts of CLA do not contain enough of the nutrient to make them acceptable sources. Since the 1960s, the CLA content of meat and dairy products has declined dramatically. Ruminants (beef, lamb and veal) used to contain substantial amounts of CLA in their muscle tissue, but switching these animals from pasture land (grass diets) to feedlots where they are primarily fed grain has resulted in approximately a 75% decline in these animals.

Researchers from the University of Florence report that ewe's milk, which is rich in CLA appears to reduce markers linked to heart disease. The study included 10 subjects who were randomly assigned to either consume a diet containing 200 grams per week of cheese from ewe's milk (pecorino cheese), naturally rich in CLA, or cheese from cow's milk (placebo), for 10 weeks. The results revealed that those who consumed the CLA-rich diet of ewe's milk saw significant reductions in inflammatory markers while no significant changes were observed in the placebo group. It was further discovered that those consuming the CLA cheese experienced a 10 percent reduction in the extent of platelet aggregation, induced by arachidonic acid. It appears that diets rich in CLA may be able to reduce the atherosclerotic process, which is the primary cause of coronary heart disease.1

1 Sofi F, Buccioni A, Cesari F, et al. Effects of a dairy product (pecorino cheese) naturally rich in cis-9, trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid on lipid, inflammatory and haemorheological variables: A dietary intervention study. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. May2009.

This information is educational in context and is not to be used to diagnose, treat or cure any disease. Please consult your licensed health care practitioner before using this or any medical information.
©2000-2009 CCG, Inc. All Rights Reserved.