Calling All Heart Patients Greensboro NC

The researchers found that patients in Greensboro who took part in these telehealth interventions had a 30 percent lower death rate than patients without the interventions. The telehealth patients also had lower total cholesterol levels, lower levels of systolic blood pressure and lower rates of smoking.

Edmund Joseph Le Bauer, MD
(336) 547-1752
PO Box 26201
Greensboro, NC
Specialties
Cardiology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Duke Univ Sch Of Med, Durham Nc 27710
Graduation Year: 1960
Hospital
Hospital: Moses H Cone Memorial Hospital, Greensboro, Nc
Group Practice: Lebauer Health Care

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Dr.Stanley Tennant
(336) 272-6133
1002 N Church St # 103
Greensboro, NC
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ
Year of Graduation: 1978
Speciality
Cardiologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Mohan N Harwani
(336) 273-3335
200 E Northwood St
Greensboro, NC
Specialty
Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Thomas David Stuckey, MD
(336) 547-1756
1126 N Church St Ste 300
Greensboro, NC
Specialties
Cardiology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Oh State Univ Coll Of Med, Columbus Oh 43210
Graduation Year: 1979
Hospital
Hospital: Moses H Cone Memorial Hospital, Greensboro, Nc
Group Practice: Lebauer Health Care

Data Provided by:
Paula Virginia Ross, MD
(336) 547-1752
520 N Elam Ave
Greensboro, NC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mi Med Sch, Ann Arbor Mi 48109
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided by:
Alfred Boyd Little, MD
(336) 954-9954
1331 N Elm St
Greensboro, NC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Nc At Chapel Hill Sch Of Med, Chapel Hill Nc 27599
Graduation Year: 1978

Data Provided by:
Stewart Allan Schall, MD
(336) 832-8060
1200 N Elm St
Greensboro, NC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Pa Sch Of Med, Philadelphia Pa 19104
Graduation Year: 1964

Data Provided by:
Daniel Robert Bensimhon
(336) 547-1752
1126 N Church St
Greensboro, NC
Specialty
Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Edmund Joseph LeBauer
(336) 547-1700
1126 N Church St
Greensboro, NC
Specialty
Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Stanley Neal Tennant, MD
(336) 272-6133
1002 N Church St Ste 103
Greensboro, NC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ, Winston-Salem Nc 27157
Graduation Year: 1978

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Calling All Heart Patients

Provided By:

WEDNESDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Telephone or Internet-based interventions may help heart attack survivors and other cardiac patients improve their heart health and reduce their risk of future cardiac events, Australian researchers say.

They reviewed published randomized trials evaluating the use of phone- or Internet-based interventions in cardiac rehabilitation programs. Two of the interventions were Internet-based; all others were by telephone.

"We aimed to determine if, in a world increasingly dominated by electronic technology, interventions for preventing recurrent coronary disease could be delivered in innovative ways to enable more people to access effective secondary prevention," the study's lead author, Lis Neubeck of Concord Repatriation General Hospital in Sydney, said in a news release from the European Society of Cardiology.

"Our analysis, which involved more than 3,000 patients across 11 studies, suggests that the electronic age is indeed providing effective alternatives for the delivery of preventive health change," Neubeck added.

The researchers found that patients who took part in these telehealth interventions had a 30 percent lower death rate than patients without the interventions. The telehealth patients also had lower total cholesterol levels, lower levels of systolic blood pressure and lower rates of smoking.

The study appears in the June issue of the European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation.

People are "increasingly time-poor," which can make it difficult for them to attend cardiac-rehabilitation programs at hospitals or other facilities, according to Neubeck, who stated: "Utilizing electronic technologies has the potential to increase access for these services without compromising outcomes."

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about cardiac rehabilitation.

SOURCE: European Society of Cardiology, news release, June 16, 2009

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