Cancer-Causing Proteins Fayetteville NC

The drugs, called thiazole antibiotics, appear to block a cellular protein called FoxM1, one of the most over-produced proteins in cancer cells, according to researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine. FoxM1 is believed to play an important role in causing cells to become cancerous and may present a promising target for future anti-cancer treatments.

Shirish Devasthali, MD
(910) 483-8586
PO Box 53095
Fayetteville, NC
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Languages
Hindi, Other, Russian
Education
Medical School: First Moscow Sechenov Med Inst, Moscow, Russia
Graduation Year: 1980
Hospital
Hospital: Cape Fear Valley Med Center, Fayetteville, Nc
Group Practice: Blood & Cancer Clinic

Data Provided by:
Tariq Nazir, MD
(910) 483-8586
PO Box 53095
Fayetteville, NC
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Hematology-Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Sind Med Coll, Univ Of Karachi, Karachi,
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided by:
Herman Allen Godwin, MD
(919) 323-1152
1813 Lakeshore Dr
Fayetteville, NC
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ, Winston-Salem Nc 27157
Graduation Year: 1963

Data Provided by:
Markandu Ketheeswaran, MD
(910) 485-7003
PO Box 87427
Fayetteville, NC
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: St George'S Univ, Sch Of Med, St George'S, Grenada
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided by:
Mykhanh Connie Nguyen, MD
(336) 716-4551
1638 Owen Dr
Fayetteville, NC
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ca, Los Angeles, Ucla Sch Of Med, Los Angeles Ca 90024
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided by:
Christina Lee Wells, MD
(910) 484-4615
1133 Offshore Dr
Fayetteville, NC
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Va Sch Of Med, Charlottesville Va 22908
Graduation Year: 1992

Data Provided by:
John Hugh Bryan, MD
(910) 609-6690
PO Box 41208
Fayetteville, NC
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology, Pediatrics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Nc At Chapel Hill Sch Of Med, Chapel Hill Nc 27599
Graduation Year: 1969
Hospital
Hospital: Cape Fear Valley Med Center, Fayetteville, Nc; Southeastern Reg Med Ctr, Lumberton, Nc
Group Practice: South East Radiation Oncology

Data Provided by:
Sajjad A Malick, MD
(910) 609-6910
PO Box 42935
Fayetteville, NC
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Dow Med Coll, Univ Of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan
Graduation Year: 1988
Hospital
Hospital: Cape Fear Valley Med Center, Fayetteville, Nc; Betsy Johnson Mem Hosp, Dunn, Nc
Group Practice: Hematology Oncology Assoc

Data Provided by:
Shirish D DeVasthali
(910) 483-8586
2125 Valleygate Dr
Fayetteville, NC
Specialty
Medical Oncology

Data Provided by:
Mashour Yousef Yousef, MD
(910) 483-8586
2125 Valleygate Dr Ste 101
Fayetteville, NC
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tichreen, Fac Of Med, Lattakia, Syria (Univ Latakia)
Graduation Year: 1989
Hospital
Hospital: Cape Fear Valley Med Center, Fayetteville, Nc
Group Practice: Blood & Cancer Clinic

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Cancer-Causing Proteins

Provided By:

Scientists are closer to understanding how a recently approved class of antibiotics may work against cancer.

The drugs, called thiazole antibiotics, appear to block a cellular protein called FoxM1, one of the most over-produced proteins in cancer cells, according to researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine. FoxM1 is believed to play an important role in causing cells to become cancerous and may present a promising target for future anti-cancer treatments.

The researchers also found that thiazoles may inhibit proteasomes, a molecular complex within cells that disposes of old proteins marked for destruction. Recently, a number of proteasome inhibitors have shown promise against cancer. One of these inhibitors, bortezomib (Velcade), has proven effective against a number of cancers, including myeloma and certain forms of lymphoma.

The new research, which appears in the online journal PLoS ONE, points to the possible anti-cancer use of thiazoles in the future. In a university news release, study author Andrei Gartel, an associate professor of molecular genetics, said that by using thiazole antibiotics in combination with well-known proteasome inhibitors, "we may see a synergy that allows us to markedly reduce the dose of any one of these drugs and still effectively kill the cancer cells."

More information

Read more about cancer treatments at the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

SOURCE: University of Illinois at Chicago, news release, Aug. 11, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com