Cancer Drug Responses Wilmington NC

new way to predict which brain cancer patients will respond to the drug Avastin has been developed by U.S. researchers.

Peter Ungaro, MD
(910) 342-3001
109 Darley Ln
Wilmington, NC
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Arvil D Stephen, MD
(910) 772-7573
3151 S 17th St
Wilmington, NC
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Kenneth Irvin Fink
(910) 772-9202
2131 S 17th St
Wilmington, NC
Specialty
Medical Oncology

Data Provided by:
Brenda Ann Carroll, MD
(919) 341-3300
1202 Medical Center Dr
Cape Fear, NC
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med, Charleston Sc 29425
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided by:
Elizabeth Harrer Yoffe, MD
7221 Gray Gables
Wilmington, NC
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Fl Coll Of Med, Gainesville Fl 32610
Graduation Year: 1977

Data Provided by:
Andrew Philip Brown, MD
(910) 763-1137
2800 Ashton Dr
Wilmington, NC
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of London, Royal Free Hosp Sch Med (See 917-34)
Graduation Year: 1978

Data Provided by:
Walter Henry Gajewski, MD
(910) 762-9093
2131 S 17th St
Wilmington, NC
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Gynecological Oncology, Obstetrics And Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med, Charleston Sc 29425
Graduation Year: 1982
Hospital
Hospital: St Annes Hospital, Fall River, Ma; Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, Ri; Women & Infants Hospital Of R, Providence, Ri
Group Practice: Anesthesia Associates Of New London Pc

Data Provided by:
Dr.Walter Gajewski
(910) 343-0161
2131 South 17th Street
Wilmington, NC
Gender
M
Speciality
Oncologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
William McNulty, MD
(919) 763-5182
1515 Doctors Cir
Wilmington, NC
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Sc Sch Of Med, Columbia Sc 29208
Graduation Year: 1982

Data Provided by:
William Mc Nulty, MD
(910) 763-5182
1515 Doctors Cir
Wilmington, NC
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Sc Sch Of Med, Columbia Sc 29208
Graduation Year: 1982

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Cancer Drug Responses

Provided By:

A new way to predict which brain cancer patients will respond to the drug Avastin has been developed by U.S. researchers.

Avastin, which shrinks tumors by cutting off their blood supply, was approved this spring by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treatment of aggressive brain cancer. However, half of those with the cancer don't respond to the drug, which can cost up to $10,000 a month, according to a news release from the University of California, Los Angeles.

UCLA researchers examined 82 people who had surgery and radiation to treat glioblastoma, the most common and deadly form of adult brain cancer. Half of them were given infusions of Avastin every two weeks, and all had monthly MRI brain scans to monitor changes.

An analysis of the scans showed that there was greater water movement in the tumors of people who later had the best response to Avastin. By using MRI to measure the amount of water motion within the tumor, the researchers were able to predict with 70 percent accuracy which tumors would progress within six months and which would not.

Increased water movement in tumors is linked with higher levels of a growth factor called VEGF, which is secreted by a tumor to promote the growth of new blood vessels that provide the tumor with oxygen and nutrients. Avastin blocks VEGF, the researchers explained.

"When we realized that high levels of VEGF are linked to greater cell death and increased water movement, we were able to predict the patients' response to Avastin before they began treatment," lead author Dr. Whitney Pope, assistant professor of radiological sciences at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine, said in the news release.

"We were correct 70 percent of the time," Pope said. "Previously, identifying which patients would respond was like flipping a coin. This is a huge improvement."

The study appears in the July issue of Radiology.

"Knowing this information ahead of time will help doctors personalize therapy for each patient and decrease exposure to side effects," Pope said.

He and a co-author are consultants for Genentech, which makes Avastin, and are working with the company on several research studies.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about brain tumors.

SOURCE: University of California, Los Angeles, news release, July 30, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com