Career Tips for Yoga Teachers Durham NC

Teaching to a target audience isn't for everyone. And the maxim of "teach what you know and what inspires you" applies to gender-specific classes, too.

J Michael Pope
(919) 489-5456
2903 Chapel Hill RD
Durham, NC
 
Mullinix Steven Ph.D.
(919) 785-0384
4201 Lake Boone Trl
Raleigh, NC
 
Superior School of Real Estate
(704) 944-4260
14825 John J. Delaney Drive Suite 240-15
Charlotte, NC
 
Instruction for all Reasons - IFAR
(704) 442-9315
524 Jefferson Drive
Charlotte, NC
 
J Michael Pope
(919) 489-5456
2903 Chapel Hill RD
Durham, NC
 
Careerpro Resumes
(919) 787-2400
3700 National DR
Raleigh, NC
 
Dew K Michie Harriss Ph.D.
(336) 272-0855
806 Green Valley Rd
Greensboro, NC
 
David Hall Career Conculting
(336) 499-8585
3447 Robinhood RD
Winston-Salem, NC
 
Career Choices
(336) 765-7557
1328 Westgate Center DR
Winston-Salem, NC
 
ITT Technical Institute
(704) 423-3100
4135 South Stream Boulevard
Charlotte, NC
 

Career Tips for Yoga Teachers

Provided By:

By Sara Avant Stover

As teachers, we can be artists who sculpt experiences for our students through the words we use to teach a pose, the music we play during class, or even the ways we decorate our studios. We can also create a more meaningful experience by opting to teach to target audiences.

This is not a new concept. A glance at any studio's schedule offers us plenty of options: Basics, Level 2/3, Hot Yoga, Prenatal Yoga, Mysore, Meditation. Rarely, however, do we see options such as Women's Yoga or Men's Yoga listed.

Yes, yoga offers freedom to everyone, regardless of age, gender, ethnicity, or religion; but are there times when it would be more effective to teach to men or women only? And if so, is such an undertaking financially viable?

Let Personal Experience Guide You

Teaching to a target audience isn't for everyone. And the maxim of "teach what you know and what inspires you" applies to gender-specific classes, too.

For Janice Gates, author of Yogini: The Power of Women in Yoga and owner of the Yoga Garden in San Anselmo, California, the inspiration to teach women's-only yoga retreats arose out of her personal practice.

"In the early '90s, when I was practicing and teaching Ashtanga Yoga," she explains, "I kept bumping up against the reality that the practice was designed by and for men and had a very masculine flavor to it. Meanwhile, most of my students at that time were women."

Click here to read full article from Yoga Journal