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Causes of ADHD Cary NC

The trouble concentrating that affects people with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) might be related to motivation, a new study has found. The motivational problems seen with the condition, which is often associated with children but can persist into adulthood, appear to stem from a reduction in dopamine, an important neurotransmitter in the nervous system that is considered a hallmark of ADHD.

Ms. Irene Kennedy
Irene vanD Kennedy, LCSW
(919) 571-2671
3716 National Drive Suite 224
Raleigh, NC
Credentials
Credentials: MSW, LCSW
Licensed in North Carolina
25 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Depression, Interpersonal Relationships, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Women's Issues
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Dr. Kristen Wynns
(919) 429-7509
1135 Kildaire Farm Rd.
Cary, NC
Specialties
Child or Adolescent, ADHD, psychoeducational evaluations
Qualification
School: University of North Carolina - Greensboro
Year of Graduation: 2003
Years In Practice: 5 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: Female
Age: Adolescents,Adults,Children
Average Cost
$130 - $140
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: No
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes

Dr. Eve Fontaine
(919) 428-2766 x3
OrensteinSolutions1100 NW Maynard Rd.
Cary, NC
Specialties
Child or Adolescent, Anxiety or Fears, ADHD, Impulse Control Disorders
Qualification
School: Texas A&M University - College Station
Year of Graduation: 2005
Years In Practice: 3 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: Female
Age: Adolescents,Adults,Children
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: No

Dr. Kristen Wynns
(919) 429-7509
130 Preston Executive Drive
Cary, NC
Specialties
Child or Adolescent, Attention Deficit (ADHD), psychoeducational evaluations
Qualification
School: University of North Carolina - Greensboro
Year of Graduation: 2003
Years In Practice: 8 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Children (6 to 10),Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults
Average Cost
$130 - $140
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: No
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes

Dr. Dan Chartier
(252) 349-0938
5613 Duraleigh Road
Raleigh, NC
Specialties
Anxiety or Fears, Depression, ADHD, Dissociative Disorders
Qualification
School: NCSU
Year of Graduation: 1983
Years In Practice: 20+ Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: Male
Age: Adolescents,Adults,Children
Average Cost
$120 - $130
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: No

Mrs. Kim Mitchell
Creative Solutions Counseling, LLC
(919) 782-0272
5561-201 McNeely Drive
Raleigh, NC
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in North Carolina
27 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Domestic Violence, Eating Disorders, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Infertility, Interpersonal Relationships, Obsessive/Compulsive Disorder,
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Disabled, Caregivers, Step Families, Chronic Illness, Cancer Patients
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Dr. Susan B Alexander
(919) 460-1414
Susan B. Alexander, Ph.D.1145 Executive Circle
Cary, NC
Specialties
Depression, Anxiety or Fears, Attention Deficit (ADHD), Mood Disorders
Qualification
School: Duke University
Year of Graduation: 1985
Years In Practice: 20+ Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Children (6 to 10),Preteens / Tweens (11 to 13),Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults,Elders (65+)
Average Cost
$140 - $150
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: No
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: Aetna

Ms. Laura Brightwood
(919) 500-7312
3-C Family Services1901 N Harrison Ave
Cary, NC
Specialties
Relationship Issues, ADHD, Parenting, Elderly Persons Disorders
Qualification
School: University of Kentucky
Year of Graduation: 1996
Years In Practice: 10+ Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: Female
Age: Adolescents,Adults,Children,Elders
Average Cost
$110 - $130
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: Horizon Healthcare

Rebecca S Reid
(919) 429-7094
5040 Tryon Road
Raleigh, NC
Specialties
Relationship Issues, Child or Adolescent, ADHD, Thinking Disorders
Qualification
School: Wake Forest University
Year of Graduation: 1984
Years In Practice: 20+ Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: Female
Age: Adolescents,Adults
Average Cost
$100 - $110
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: No

Dr. Allan A Bloom
(919) 429-7789
Allan A Bloom Ph.D. and Associates4000 Blue Ridge Road
Raleigh, NC
Specialties
Relationship Issues, Depression, ADHD, Impulse Control Disorders
Qualification
School: North Carolina State University
Year of Graduation: 1987
Years In Practice: 30+ Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: Male
Age: Adolescents,Adults,Children,Elders
Average Cost
$80 - $90
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: Aetna

Data Provided by:

Causes of ADHD

Provided By:

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The trouble concentrating that affects people with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) might be related to motivation, a new study has found.

The motivational problems seen with the condition, which is often associated with children but can persist into adulthood, appear to stem from a reduction in dopamine, an important neurotransmitter in the nervous system that is considered a hallmark of ADHD.

"ADHD is traditionally a disease where people think the disruption is in attention and hyperactivity," said Dr. Nora D. Volkow, director of the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse and lead researcher on the study. "So, the whole focus on research and treatment has been on attention -- with kids who cannot pay attention or are hyperactive."

Recent studies have found that children with ADHD don't respond to rewards in the same way as children without ADHD, Volkow said. "In addition to the classic symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity, there is also a disruption in motivations and sensitivity to rewards," she said.

The new study "found a disruption in the brain's reward/motivation pathway" in people with ADHD, Volkow said. "We also found that disruption in this area was directly related to the severity of inattention."

The implication of the finding is that ADHD might begin with disruption in motivation, which in turn leads to inattention and hyperactivity, she said.

Volkow described it as "a disruption in interest."

The finding, reported in the Sept. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, could have an impact on treating the condition, she said. "My strategy would be rather than exercising the attention network, let me give an intervention that will make the task much more engaging," she said.

For the study, 53 adults with ADHD underwent positron emission tomography (PET) scans for dopamine markers. The researchers compared the results with PET scans of 44 adults without the condition.

Among those with ADHD, the researchers found disruptions in the two dopamine pathways associated with reward and motivation. The finding, according to the researchers, lends support to the theory that ADHD is a result of problems in dopamine pathways in the brain that affect both reward and motivation.

About 3 percent to 5 percent of adults in the United States have some form of ADHD, the researchers noted.

The current medications given to children with ADHD already enhance motivation because they target the dopamine pathway, Volkow said.

But the finding should also be considered a "wake-up call for teachers," she said. Knowing that the problem is one of motivation, teachers could devise methods to provide "extra engagement" for these children, Volkow said.

Even children with ADHD can concentrate on tasks they like and find engaging, such as computer games, she noted. The trick is to bring that same level of engagement into the classroom, she said.

"It's a great opportunity to develop curriculum that is much more exciting and engaging for kids suffering from ADHD," Volkow said.

Dr. Andrew Adesman, chief of developmental and behavioral pediatrics at Schneider Children's Hospital in New York, said the study "provides further evidence that dopamine deficiencies in specific areas of the mid-brain are likely responsible for ADHD."

"Since many believe that ADHD results from reward and motivational deficits, this study provides further support for this association," he said.

"Patients and professionals must recognize, however, that despite research advances identifying differences in the brains of patients with ADHD, the diagnosis of ADHD remains a clinical one," Adesman said. "ADHD cannot be diagnosed by neuroimaging."

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health has more on ADHD.

SOURCES: Nora D. Volkow, M.D., director, U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse, Bethesda, Md.; Andrew Adesman, M.D., chief, developmental and behavioral pediatrics, Schneider Children's Hospital, New Hyde Park, N.Y.; Sept. 9, 2009, Journal of the American Medical Association

Author: By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

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