Changing Plant Names Charlotte NC

Sometimes as I read my gardening books and magazines I come across a Latin plant name followed by a parentheses that says another name the plant was formerly known by people in Charlotte as - which is often more familiar to me. Why do the plant namers do this to us?

The Royal Gardens
(704) 334-3764
1733 East 7th Street
Charlotte, NC
Products / Services
Fountains - Decorative, Garden Centers / Nurseries, Groundcovers, Landscaping Services, Perennials, Plants, Shrubs, Trees

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Blackhawk Gardens
(704) 525-2682
4225 Park Road Shopping Center
Charlotte, NC
Products / Services
Groundcovers, Perennials, Plants, Shrubs, Trees

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Rountree Plantation Greenhouse & Garden Center
(704) 523-6362
610 Scholtz Rd
Charlotte, NC
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Annuals, Arbors / Arches, Arrangement Accessories, Bird Baths, Bird Feeders, Builders / Contractors, Bulbs, Ceramic, Terra Cotta & Stone Containers, Chemicals, Conifers / Evergreens, Containers, Containers - Decorative, Crop Protection, Decorative Planters & Urns, Display Structures, Fertilizers, Flags, Windsocks & Poles, Fountains - Decorative, Furniture / Structures, Garden Center Marketing, Garden Centers / Nurseries, Garden Ornaments, Gardening Tools, Gardening Gloves, Gardening Supplies…

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Instant Organic Garden
(704) 364-1784
7032 Stoneridge Road
Charlotte, NC

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Pike Family Nursery
(704) 341-7453
12630 North Community House Road
Charlotte, NC
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Garden Centers / Nurseries, Groundcovers, Perennials, Plants, Shrubs, Trees

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Peraus Design & Maintenance
(704) 564-7339
1900 Sandhurst Drive
Charlotte, NC

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Garden Secrets
(704) 554-7856
6601 Morrison Blvd.
Charlotte, NC
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Annuals, Bulbs, Chemicals, Crop Protection, Garden Center Marketing, Garden Centers / Nurseries, Garden Ornaments, Groundcovers, Horticulture Companies, Mulch, Perennials, Pest Control Supplies, Plants, Roses, Seeds, Shrubs, Trees

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Oakdale Greenhouses
(704) 596-4052
5626 Statesville Road
Charlotte, NC
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Annuals, Bulbs, Chemicals, Crop Protection, Garden Center Marketing, Garden Centers / Nurseries, Garden Ornaments, Horticulture Companies, Mulch, Perennials, Plants, Roses, Seeds, Shrubs, Trees

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King's Greenhouse
(704) 821-7507
524 Stallings Rd
Matthews, NC
Products / Services
Annuals, Builders / Contractors, Bulbs, Chemicals, Crop Protection, Garden Center Marketing, Garden Centers / Nurseries, Garden Ornaments, Groundcovers, Horticulture Companies, Mulch, Perennials, Pest Control Supplies, Plants, Roses, Seeds, Shrubs, Trees

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Colchester Place Garden & Nursery Inc.
(704) 841-2562
10812 Monroe Road
Matthews, NC
Products / Services
Groundcovers, Perennials, Plants, Shrubs, Trees

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Changing Plant Names

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Sometimes as I read my gardening books and magazines I come across a Latin plant name followed by a parentheses that says another name the plant was formerly known as—which is often more familiar to me. Why do the plant namers do this to us?



Answer: Changes in long-established names are a nuisance for everyone and may seem difficult to justify—especially where a familiar name changes to something that is hard to remember and to spell, and even more difficult to pronounce. However, there are usually good reasons for the change.



The “principle of priority,” as it is known, has established that the first written description of a plant is taken as its valid name. Familiar names can therefore sometimes fall from grace as new information comes to light from ever more obscure places around the globe. Herbaria in libraries in the former Soviet Union are now being studied by experts and we are having to accept earlier names for some plant familiar to generations of gardeners. The “new” name may mean nothing to us and may be very hard for some of us to pronounce—try saying Allium przewalskianum quickly.



Another reason for name changes is that modern scientists are able to detect ever more minute differences (and similarities) in plant characteristics. This means that sometimes new plants must be separated into a new genus: our old friend Senecio ‘Sunshine’ became Brachyglottis ‘Sunshine’, while the once-familiar genus Cimicifuga has disappeared into another genus, Actaea. As for the florists chrysanthemum, it was Dendranthema only to be returned to Chrysanthemum a few years later. Occasionally taxonomists run out of names and resort to using an anagram of an existing one: the genus Saruma has been created from the closely related Asarum.



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From Horticulture Magazine