Chemical Dangers for Moms-to-Be Winston Salem NC

Chemicals with the tongue-twisting name of phthalates (pronounced THAL ates) are nearly ubiquitous in consumer products, found in items from soaps, lotion and cosmetics to plastics and toys. A little over a decade ago, environmental organizations such as the Environmental Working Group began to focus on phthalates and have been working ever since for tighter regulation or, in some cases, bans.

Jonathan Dunbar Weston, MD
(336) 725-8874
495 N Cleveland Ave
Winston Salem, NC
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Rochester Sch Of Med & Dentistry, Rochester Ny 14642
Graduation Year: 1975

Data Provided by:
James Joseph Phillips, MD
(609) 927-3828
Medical Center Boulevard,
Winston-Salem, NC
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Auto De Guadalajara, Fac De Med, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided by:
Henry Hengjui Chang, MD
(336) 650-9133
305 Braeburn Dr
Winston Salem, NC
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: New York Med Coll, Valhalla Ny 10595
Graduation Year: 1996

Data Provided by:
Ngina Kai Connors
(336) 716-2255
Medical Center Blvd
Winston-Salem, NC
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Harold C Pollard
(336) 765-9350
2927 Lyndhurst Ave
Winston-Salem, NC
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Willard L Mc Cloud, MD
(336) 723-2719
620 Dunleith Ave
Winston Salem, NC
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Meharry Med Coll Sch Of Med, Nashville Tn 37208
Graduation Year: 1948

Data Provided by:
Lisa Nichole Miller, MD
(336) 788-6194
3105 Glenshire Dr
Winston Salem, NC
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Md Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21201
Graduation Year: 1996
Hospital
Hospital: Franklin Square Hosp Ctr, Baltimore, Md
Group Practice: White Square Obgyn

Data Provided by:
David Wayne Lee, MD
(336) 771-1565
3185 Creighton Ln
Winston Salem, NC
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Nc At Chapel Hill Sch Of Med, Chapel Hill Nc 27599
Graduation Year: 1982

Data Provided by:
Herbert Alva Soper, MD
(336) 768-1180
1901 S Hawthorne Rd Ste 320
Winston Salem, NC
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ar Coll Of Med, Little Rock Ar 72205
Graduation Year: 1960

Data Provided by:
Scott Alan Washburn, MD
(336) 993-4532
Bowman Gray Sch Medicine Medicine Center Blvd-Dept Obgyn,
Winston Salem, NC
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ar Coll Of Med, Little Rock Ar 72205
Graduation Year: 1986
Hospital
Hospital: Wake Forest Baptist Med Ctr, Winston Salem, Nc
Group Practice: Lyndhurst Gynecologic Associates

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Chemical Dangers for Moms-to-Be

Provided By:

SATURDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Chemicals with the tongue-twisting name of phthalates (pronounced THAL ates) are nearly ubiquitous in consumer products, found in items from soaps, lotion and cosmetics to plastics and toys.

A little over a decade ago, environmental organizations such as the Environmental Working Group began to focus on phthalates and have been working ever since for tighter regulation or, in some cases, bans.

On the other side are groups such as the American Chemistry Council, representing the industries that produce phthalate-containing products. It says it supports "science-based product safety decisions."

If you're a consumer, chances are extremely high that you've been exposed to phthalates, said Sonya Lunder, a senior analyst with the Environmental Working Group. "About 95 percent of people have measurable levels of these chemicals, the phthalates, in them," she said. Often younger women, partly because of cosmetic use, have higher levels, she said.

Over the past few years, researchers have uncovered multiple health hazards, either in animal or human studies, linked to phthalates. For instance, the chemicals have been found to lower sperm quality in men as well as testosterone levels, in turn perhaps setting them up for unhealthy abdominal obesity.

Pregnant women working in the beauty industry have been found at higher risk for giving birth to boys with birth defects.

Exposure to the chemicals also has been linked with early-onset puberty and with a higher risk of breast cancer later on in adulthood.

And a study released in late June suggested that low birth weight in babies was linked to their mothers' exposure to phthalates while pregnant.

To date, the strongest links between phthalates and health have focused on reproductive problems, said Shanna Swan, a professor and director of the Center for Reproductive Epidemiology at the University of Rochester School of Medicine in New York.

"The next wave is asthma and allergy," predicted Swan, a veteran researcher in the field. That link, between the chemicals and the asthma and allergy problems, she said, is getting stronger.

As the findings of potential health hazards have unfolded, environmentalists have pushed for stronger regulation, and in some cases they've succeeded.

Under a recent law, the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008, children's toys and child-care articles cannot contain more than 0.1 percent of six different phthalates. The regulation took effect Feb. 10 of this year.

In addition, a report from the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences issued in late 2008 concluded that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency should examine whether combined exposure to phthalates can cause an adverse health effect. The council experts called for a cumulative risk assessment and suggested looking at other chemicals as well, not just chemicals within the phthalate family.

Lunder agreed with that recommendation. "We can't do this one chemical at a time," she said. What's crucial is to look at all chemicals in use, she said, adding that that's a task much easier said than done.

But looking at cumulative risk is important, Swan agreed. "We are getting multiple hits not only from phthalates [exposure] but other chemicals," she said.

On its Web site, the American Chemistry Council emphasizes the importance of first proving a hazard before removing chemicals from products.

For instance, in a statement issued April 2, Sharon Kneiss, a council vice president, protested decisions by some manufacturers to remove phthalates from some fragrance applications "without any scientific or regulatory basis." She contended that their use in fragrances does not present a hazard.

Chris Bryant, managing director of the council's chemical products and technology division, said that the organization welcomes reviews and more science on the effects of phthalates. And it supports the call for cumulative risk assessment and the study of the chemicals also underway by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, he said.

"These reviews will reaffirm the findings of scores of studies conducted by governmental agencies around the world that phthalates are safe for their intended uses," Bryant said.

More information

The Environmental Working Group has more on phthalates.

SOURCES: Sonya Lunder, Ph.D., senior analyst, Environmental Working Group, Washington, D.C.; Shanna H. Swan, Ph.D., professor and associate chairwoman for research, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and director, Center for Reproductive Epidemiology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, N.Y.; Chris Bryant, managing director, chemical products and technology division, American Chemistry Council, Arlington, Va.; American Chemistry Council

Author: By Kathleen Doheny
HealthDay Reporter

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