Chemo Regimen for Ovarian Cancer Winston Salem NC

Dose-dense chemotherapy improves survival in women with advanced ovarian cancer, Japanese researchers say. Currently, paclitaxel and carboplatin given every three weeks is considered standard first-line chemotherapy for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. However, dose-dense weekly treatment with paclitaxel is seen as a way to increase progression-free and overall survival in these patients in Winston Salem, according to the new study findings.

Jacob Benj Millard Goff, MD
(910) 256-8307
Winston Salem, NC
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In New Orleans, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1963

Data Provided by:
David L Mc Cullough, MD
(336) 716-9514
Med Center Blvd,
Winston-Salem, NC
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ, Winston-Salem Nc 27157
Graduation Year: 1964
Hospital
Hospital: Wake Forest Baptist Med Ctr, Winston Salem, Nc
Group Practice: Dept Of Urology Wake Forest University School Of Medicine

Data Provided by:
Daniel Eberli, MD
(336) 713-7280
Medical Center Boulevard,
Winston-Salem, NC
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Thomas Earl Shown, MD
(336) 650-0444
2625 Evans Rd
Winston Salem, NC
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Louisville Sch Of Med, Louisville Ky 40202
Graduation Year: 1961

Data Provided by:
Laura Allison Culp, MD
(336) 768-0735
140 Kimel Park Dr
Winston Salem, NC
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Nc At Chapel Hill Sch Of Med, Chapel Hill Nc 27599
Graduation Year: 1996

Data Provided by:
Ernest Edward Hodge, MD
(216) 445-7031
2420 Edison Ct
Winston Salem, NC
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Med Sch At San Antonio, San Antonio Tx 78284
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided by:
Scott Avard MacDiarmid, MD
(336) 716-4310
Medical Center Blvd,
Winston-Salem, NC
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Dalhousie Univ, Fac Of Med, Halifax, Ns, Canada
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided by:
Stephen Eric Gwynn, MD
(336) 716-5702
2276 Briar Glen Rd
Winston Salem, NC
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Elizabeth Ann Albertson, MD
(336) 245-2100
140 Kimel Park Dr
Winston Salem, NC
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Va Sch Of Med, Charlottesville Va 22908
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided by:
Andrew Steven Griffin, MD
(336) 245-2121
140 Kimel Park Dr
Winston Salem, NC
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ, Winston-Salem Nc 27157
Graduation Year: 1983

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Chemo Regimen for Ovarian Cancer

Provided By:

SUNDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Dose-dense chemotherapy improves survival in women with advanced ovarian cancer, Japanese researchers say.

Currently, paclitaxel and carboplatin given every three weeks is considered standard first-line chemotherapy for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. However, dose-dense weekly treatment with paclitaxel is seen as a way to increase progression-free and overall survival in these patients, according to the new study findings.

This phase 3 study of 637 women compared the two approaches. The participants had advanced epithelial ovarian cancer, fallopian tube cancer, or primary peritoneal cancer.

The 320 patients in the conventional regimen group received six cycles of paclitaxel (180 milligrams per meter squared; three-hour intravenous infusion). The 317 patients in the dose-dense group received paclitaxel (80 milligrams per meter squared; one-hour intravenous infusion) on days one, eight and 15. Both groups received carboplatin on day one of a 21-day cycle.

The patients in the dose-dense group had longer median progression-free survival than those in the standard treatment group (28 months versus 17 months), and longer overall survival at three years (72 percent versus 65 percent). This means that women in the dose-dense group had a 29 percent lower risk of cancer progression and a 25 percent lower risk of death, the authors explained.

Toxicity forced 113 patients in the dose-dense group and 69 patients in the conventional therapy group to stop treatment, the researchers noted. Severe anemia occurred in 214 patients (69 percent) in the dose-dense group and in 137 (44 percent) of the standard therapy group.

The survival benefits seen in the dose-dense group are rare in patients with advanced ovarian cancer, and this regimen offers a new treatment option for women with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer, concluded Dr. Noriyuki Katsumata, of the National Cancer Center Hospital in Tokyo, and colleagues.

The study, published in an upcoming print issue of The Lancet, was released online Sunday to coincide with the European Cancer Organization meeting held Sept. 20 to 24 in Berlin.

"The use of such dose-dense therapy should be decided on an individual basis together with other options for women with advanced-stage ovarian cancer," Dr. Michael A. Bookman, of the Arizona Cancer Center in Tucson, wrote in an accompanying commentary in The Lancet.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about ovarian cancer.

SOURCE: The Lancet, news release, Sept. 19, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com