Childhood Obesity Solution Asheville NC

Researchers are recommending that officials in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia rethink their efforts to combat obesity in children because the current strategies -- emphasizing healthy diets and exercise -- aren't working.

Bazemore W Carl MD
(828) 255-7733
30 Choctaw Street
Asheville, NC
 
Asheville Pulmonary & Critical Care Associates PA
(828) 255-7733
30 Choctaw Street
Asheville, NC
 
Ellen Boyd, MD
(828) 213-0022
14 Victoria Rd Ste 101
Asheville, NC
Specialties
Pediatrics
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med, Charleston Sc 29425
Graduation Year: 1975
Hospital
Hospital: Mission St Joseph Health Syste, Asheville, Nc
Group Practice: Fullerton Genetics Ctr Of Mssn

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Dickson Rolland C MD
(828) 254-0881
191 Biltmore Avenue
Asheville, NC
 
Robert Andrew Errico, MD
(828) 254-5326
77 McDowell St
Asheville, NC
Specialties
Pediatrics, Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ, Winston-Salem Nc 27157
Graduation Year: 1991

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Center for Applied Reproductive Science
(828) 285-8881
520 Biltmore Avenue
Asheville, NC
 
Bitter Karl F MD
(828) 253-5314
1 Doctors Park
Asheville, NC
 
Cummings C James MD
(828) 255-7733
30 Choctaw Street
Asheville, NC
 
Dr. Derek Holt Dephouse
77 McDowell St
Asheville, NC
Specialty
Pediatrics

Susan Rupp Mims, MD
(828) 250-5323
35 Woodfin St
Asheville, NC
Specialties
Pediatrics, Internal Medicine-Pediatrics
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Nc At Chapel Hill Sch Of Med, Chapel Hill Nc 27599
Graduation Year: 1994

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Childhood Obesity Solution

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FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers are recommending that officials in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia rethink their efforts to combat obesity in children because the current strategies -- emphasizing healthy diets and exercise -- aren't working.

In a study released online Sept. 4 in BMJ, Australian researchers followed more than 250 overweight and mildly obese Australian children who visited their general practitioners between 2005 and 2006. A total of 139 were given counseling over three months about changing their eating habits and increasing exercise; the other 119 did not get such counseling.

Parents said the kids who received counseling drank fewer soft drinks, but they didn't eat more fruit or vegetables or less fat, and they didn't lose significant amounts of weight.

The researchers reported that brief, physician-led intervention produced no long-term improvement in body mass index, physical activity or nutrition habits.

The counseling isn't harmful, the study authors noted, but it doesn't seem to work and is expensive.

"Resources may be better divided between primary prevention at the community and population levels, and enhancement of clinical treatment options for children with established obesity," the researchers concluded.

More information

For more on childhood obesity, go to U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCE: BMJ, news release, Sept. 4, 2009

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