Childhood Obesity Solution Fayetteville NC

Researchers are recommending that officials in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia rethink their efforts to combat obesity in children because the current strategies -- emphasizing healthy diets and exercise -- aren't working.

Medhavini H Dhandha, MD
(910) 437-9600
911 Hay St
Fayetteville, NC
Specialties
Pediatrics
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Bj Med Coll, Univ Of Pune, Pune, Maharashtra, India
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided by:
Dr. William Huske Kelly
(910) 484-3121
PO Box 53127
Fayetteville, NC
Specialty
Pediatrics

Dr. John Sigmund Gimesh
(609) 228-1061
Fayetteville, NC
Specialty
Pediatrics

Thomas Arthur Ciszek, MD
(910) 609-6762
PO Box 2000
Fayetteville, NC
Specialties
Pediatrics, Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: St Louis Univ Sch Of Med, St Louis Mo 63104
Graduation Year: 1977

Data Provided by:
Dr. Keith James Gallaher
(910) 609-6762
PO Box 2000
Fayetteville, NC
Specialty
Pediatrics

Niveen Youssef Iskander
(910) 484-3121
1606 Morganton Rd
Fayetteville, NC
Specialty
Pediatrics

Data Provided by:
Larry Coleman Harris, MD
(910) 323-4281
PO Box 40405
Fayetteville, NC
Specialties
Pediatrics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Duke Univ Sch Of Med, Durham Nc 27710
Graduation Year: 1977
Hospital
Hospital: Cape Fear Valley Med Center, Fayetteville, Nc

Data Provided by:
Jan Marie Carter, MD
(919) 323-6762
PO Box 2000
Fayetteville, NC
Specialties
Pediatrics, Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Eastern Va Med Sch Of The Med Coll Of Hampton Roads, Norfolk Va 23501
Graduation Year: 1982

Data Provided by:
Dr. Thomas Arthur Ciszek
(910) 609-6762
PO Box 2000
Fayetteville, NC
Specialty
Pediatrics

Fayetteville Childrens Clinic
(910) 484-3121
1606 Morganton Road
Fayetteville, NC
 
Data Provided by:

Childhood Obesity Solution

Provided By:

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers are recommending that officials in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia rethink their efforts to combat obesity in children because the current strategies -- emphasizing healthy diets and exercise -- aren't working.

In a study released online Sept. 4 in BMJ, Australian researchers followed more than 250 overweight and mildly obese Australian children who visited their general practitioners between 2005 and 2006. A total of 139 were given counseling over three months about changing their eating habits and increasing exercise; the other 119 did not get such counseling.

Parents said the kids who received counseling drank fewer soft drinks, but they didn't eat more fruit or vegetables or less fat, and they didn't lose significant amounts of weight.

The researchers reported that brief, physician-led intervention produced no long-term improvement in body mass index, physical activity or nutrition habits.

The counseling isn't harmful, the study authors noted, but it doesn't seem to work and is expensive.

"Resources may be better divided between primary prevention at the community and population levels, and enhancement of clinical treatment options for children with established obesity," the researchers concluded.

More information

For more on childhood obesity, go to U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCE: BMJ, news release, Sept. 4, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com