Cognitive Testing of Kids With Epilepsy Camp Lejeune NC

The recommendation stems from a study of 282 school-age children with an IQ of at least 70 in Camp Lejeune who had experienced their first epileptic seizure within the previous three months. The researchers looked at additional risk factors for cognitive problems, including multiple seizures, use of epilepsy drugs and signs of epilepsy on early tests of brain waves. For comparison, they examined the same data for 147 of the children's seizure-free siblings.

Neil Mac Connell King, MD
100 Brewster Blvd
Camp Lejeune, NC
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Eastern Va Med Sch Of The Med Coll Of Hampton Roads, Norfolk Va 23501
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided by:
Sean Hsu
(910) 577-4300
215 Station St
Jacksonville, NC
Specialty
Neurosurgery

Data Provided by:
Coastal Neurological Assoc
(910) 353-3624
227 Memorial Dr
Jacksonville, NC

Data Provided by:
James M Patton
(828) 210-9300
1200 Ridgefield Blvd
Asheville, NC
Specialty
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Chere M Chase
(336) 277-2200
2025 Frontis Plaza Blvd
Winston-Salem, NC
Specialty
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Dr.Clarence Ballenger
(252) 633-3744
227 Memorial Drive
Jacksonville, NC
Gender
M
Speciality
Neurologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
2.4, out of 5 based on 6, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Clarence Ballenger
(910) 353-3624
227 Memorial Dr
Jacksonville, NC
Specialty
Neurology, Alzheimer's Specialist

Zaeem Azfer Siddiqi, MD
(919) 684-5422
Dept Of Neuroduke Univ
Durham, NC
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Army Med Coll, Quaid-E-Azam Univ, Rawalpindi, Pakistan
Graduation Year: 1987

Data Provided by:
Darell Doty Bigner, MD
(919) 684-5018
Msrb177
Durham, NC
Specialties
Neurological Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Duke Univ Sch Of Med, Durham Nc 27710
Graduation Year: 1965

Data Provided by:
Steven Kent Gudeman, MD
(704) 864-5550
2555 Court Dr Ste 400
Gastonia, NC
Specialties
Neurological Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Cincinnati Coll Of Med, Cincinnati Oh 45267
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Cognitive Testing of Kids With Epilepsy

Provided By:

Children recently diagnosed with epilepsy should have their language, memory, learning and other cognitive skills tested because they're at increased risk for problems, say U.S. researchers.

The recommendation stems from a study of 282 school-age children with an IQ of at least 70 who had experienced their first epileptic seizure within the previous three months. The researchers looked at additional risk factors for cognitive problems, including multiple seizures, use of epilepsy drugs and signs of epilepsy on early tests of brain waves. For comparison, they examined the same data for 147 of the children's seizure-free siblings.

Among the children who'd had at least one seizure, 27 percent showed cognitive difficulties at or near the time of the first seizure, and 40 percent of children who had additional risk factors showed signs of cognitive problems. Children with all four risk factors were three time more likely to have cognitive problems by their first clinic visit than were children who'd not had seizures.

"Our study highlights the importance of testing children with epilepsy for possible cognitive problems soon after they are diagnosed with epilepsy in order to avoid these issues affecting them later in life, especially if they have additional risk factors," Philip Fastenau, a professor of neurology at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and the Neurological Institute of University Hospitals in Cleveland and an author of the study, said in a news release from the American Academy of Neurology.

Fastenau and his colleagues also found that children who took epilepsy drugs had problems associated with processing speed, language, verbal memory and learning, compared with children who didn't take epilepsy drugs.

"Children who take these medications should be closely monitored for cognitive problems resulting from the epilepsy drug," Fastenau said.

"Surprisingly, our study also found that academic achievement in these children was unaffected around the time of the first visit, about three months after the first seizure in this study, suggesting there is a window early in epilepsy for intervention to avoid hurting a child's performance at school," he said.

However, David Loring, of Emory University in Atlanta, said in an accompanying editorial that, because the cognitive problems were noted near the time of the first seizure, it was clear that neither the epilepsy nor the drugs caused the cognitive difficulties.

"It provides strong evidence that these cognitive problems can be attributed to underlying brain abnormalities that lead to epilepsy, rather than from extended exposure to epilepsy drugs or the effect of numerous seizures," Loring said.

The study appears online Aug. 12 in Neurology.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about epilepsy.

SOURCE: American Academy of Neurology, news release, Aug. 12, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com