Construction Contracts Wilmington NC

Sometimes the subcontractor in Wilmington is asked to waive his rights for claims on extra work. Don't do it. Never give up your rights to claims for damages or the performance of extra work under any circumstances.

Bradley A. Coxe
(910) 772-1678
3907-100
Wilmington, NC
Specialties
Medical Malpractice, Car Accident, Slip and Fall Accident, Nursing Home Abuse, Construction, Litigation, Personal Injury, Contracts
Education
University of North Carolina School of Law,University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
State Licensing
North Carolina, South Carolina

Auley M. Crouch III
(910) 846-2211
310 N FRONT ST STE 200
WILMINGTON, NC
Specialties
Litigation, Construction
Education
John Marshall Law School, Chicago,Citadel
State Licensing
North Carolina

Angelique Adams
(888) 332-1241
575 MILITARY CUTOFF RD STE 106
WILMINGTON, NC
Specialties
Arbitration, Antitrust, Construction, Class Action, Litigation
Education
Campbell University, Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law,Mount Olive College
State Licensing
North Carolina

M. Thomas Norwood III
(704) 799-7210
311 WILLIAMSON RD STE 103
MOORESVILLE, NC
Specialties
Litigation, Business, Construction, Bankruptcy, Criminal Defense
Education
Campbell University, Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law,Davidson College
State Licensing
North Carolina

James S. Schenck
(919) 789-9242
PO BOX 30933
RALEIGH, NC
Specialties
Lawsuits & Disputes, Construction, State, Local And Municipal Law
Education
University of North Carolina School of Law,Duke University,University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
State Licensing
North Carolina

Jeffrey P. Keeter
(910) 763-2727
310 N FRONT ST STE 200
WILMINGTON, NC
Specialties
Probate, Mergers & Acquisitions, Residential, Land Use & Zoning, Construction, Contracts, Wills
Education
Campbell University, Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law,Campbell University
State Licensing
North Carolina

Christopher K. Behm
(910) 763-2727
310 N FRONT ST STE 200
WILMINGTON, NC
Specialties
Litigation, Construction, Estate Planning
Education
Wake Forest University School of Law,Guilford College
State Licensing
North Carolina

Jennifer L. Bogacki
(336) 227-8851
522 S LEXINGTON AVE
BURLINGTON, NC
Specialties
Business, Commercial, Estate Planning, Wills, Criminal Defense, Construction, Contracts, Litigation, Corporate, Employment
Education
Suffolk University Law School,University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth
State Licensing
Massachusetts, North Carolina

Charles W. Bennett
(704) 844-1401
196 N TRADE ST
MATTHEWS, NC
Specialties
Residential, Commercial, Construction, Contracts, Estate Planning
Education
University of North Carolina School of Law,University of North Carolina, Asheville
State Licensing
North Carolina

Julia Young Kirkpatrick
(919) 782-1441
PO BOX 10867
RALEIGH, NC
Specialties
Construction, Litigation
Education
Campbell University, Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law,North Carolina State University
State Licensing
North Carolina

Construction Contracts

Provided By:

Source: MASONRY CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE
Publication date: February 1, 2007

By Ron Willis

Sometimes the subcontractor is asked to waive his rights for claims on extra work. Don't do it. Never give up your rights to claims for damages or the performance of extra work under any circumstances.

Subcontractors need to be compensated with more funds and time by the GC for all extras incorporated into the work that are not specifically spelled out in the contract documents. It is the general contractor's responsibility to retrieve those funds from the respective trades or owner that originally generated the extra. If the owner or any of the subcontractors or suppliers requests an extra from your firm, they should pay for it.

There is often a statement like this in the subcontract: “The subcontractor will not be paid for any extra work where the cost has not been predetermined and the time extensions have been agreed on in advance in a signed change order by the contractor.” This statement works in your favor.

However, back it up with a sentence something like this: “No extra work will be done unless requested in writing and a price agreed on by both the general contractor and the subcontractor.” However, as often as not, there will be a counter statement that says that the subcontractor must perform extra work without compensation when asked. It generally reads like this: “If any dispute arises between the contractor and subcontractor as to ...

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