» » »

Corticosteroids for Bell's Palsy Durham NC

A new review suggests that patients with Bell's Palsy benefit from treatment with corticosteroids, which dampen the immune system, and may do even better when antiviral drugs are included as well. Bell's Palsy, which causes weakness or paralysis in the facial nerve, strikes 20 to 30 people out of every 100,000.

Edward W Massey
(919) 620-4467
2100 Erwin Rd
Durham, NC
Specialty
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Jonathan Jacob Halford, MD
Durham, NC
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med, Charleston Sc 29425
Graduation Year: 1996

Data Provided by:
Timothy Merrill George, MD
(919) 684-5013
Box 3272/Neurosurgery,
Durham, NC
Specialties
Neurological Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: New York Univ Sch Of Med, New York Ny 10016
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided by:
Herbert Fuchs
(919) 620-4467
Duke University Medical Ctr
Durham, NC
Specialty
Neurosurgery

Data Provided by:
Edward Wayne Massey, MD
Durham, NC
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Med Branch Galveston, Galveston Tx 77550
Graduation Year: 1970

Data Provided by:
Daniel A Clayton, MD
(919) 684-3271
Box 3807,
Durham, NC
Specialties
Neurological Surgery
Gender
Male
Languages
English
Education
Graduation Year: 2003

Data Provided by:
Aatif Mairaj Husain, MD
(919) 684-8485
Duke Univ Med Ctr #202
Durham, NC
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Rawalpindi Med Coll, Univ Of Punjab, Rawalpindi, Pakistan
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided by:
Donald Benj Sanders, MD
(919) 684-6078
Box 3403
Durham, NC
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Harvard Med Sch, Boston Ma 02115
Graduation Year: 1964

Data Provided by:
Allan Howard Friedman, MD
(919) 684-3271
Box 3807/Neurosurgery,
Durham, NC
Specialties
Neurological Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Il Coll Of Med, Chicago Il 60680
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided by:
Jennifer Quinn
(919) 620-4467
2100 Erwin Rd
Durham, NC
Specialty
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Corticosteroids for Bell's Palsy

Provided By:

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- A new review suggests that patients with Bell's Palsy benefit from treatment with corticosteroids, which dampen the immune system, and may do even better when antiviral drugs are included as well.

Bell's Palsy, which causes weakness or paralysis in the facial nerve, strikes 20 to 30 people out of every 100,000. The condition is possibly caused by a herpes infection. About 84 percent of affected patients will fully or almost fully recover, but the others will suffer from problems such as severe facial weakness and involuntary movement, the Canadian study authors wrote.

Their report appears in the Sept. 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

In the study, the scientists reviewed existing research about treatment with corticosteroids or antiviral drugs. They found 18 of 854 studies that met their criteria to be included in a meta-analysis, which looks at evidence from numerous published studies.

The researchers found that corticosteroids reduced the risk of what they called "unsatisfactory recovery" by 9 percent overall. Antiviral drugs lowered the risk even further.

But the researchers cautioned that the added benefit of antiviral drugs wasn't "not definitive" because the results weren't statistically significant. More studies are needed to confirm that the drugs help, the researchers said in a news release from the journal.

"Until the next generation of clinical trials is completed, clinicians and patients will have to deal with substantial uncertainty in deciding whether to add antiviral drugs to corticosteroids for Bell's Palsy," wrote Dr. John F. Steiner, of Kaiser Permanente Colorado, Denver, in an accompanying editorial.

More information

For more on Bell's Palsy, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCE: American Medical Association, news release, Sept. 1, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com