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Dealing with Secondary Headaches Boone NC

Doctors define secondary headaches as those that result from a particular illness. Sometimes these illnesses are very serious and life threatening. Others may be benign but still cause pain and discomfort.

Watauga Medical Center
(828) 262-4100
Deerfield Road
Boone, NC
specialty
General medical surgical
Hospital Type
Nongovernment, Not-for-profit

Data Provided by:
Charles A Cannon Jr Mem Hosp
(828) 737-7000
434 Hospital Drive
Linville, NC
specialty
General medical surgical
Hospital Type
Nongovernment, Not-for-profit

Data Provided by:
Johnson County Community Hosp
(423) 727-1100
1901 South Shady Street
Mountain City, TN
specialty
General medical surgical
Hospital Type
Nongovernment, Not-for-profit
Hospital System
Mountain States Hlth Alliance

Data Provided by:
Watauga Medical Center
(828) 262-4100
Po Box 2600
Boone, NC
Specialty
Hospitals

Blowing Rock Hospital
(828) 295-7373
Chestnut Dr Box 148
Blowing Rock, NC
Specialty
Hospitals

Blowing Rock Hospital
(828) 295-3136
Chestnut Street
Blowing Rock, NC
specialty
General medical surgical
Hospital Type
Nongovernment, Not-for-profit

Data Provided by:
Ashe Memorial Hospital
(336) 846-7101
200 Hospital Avenue
Jefferson, NC
specialty
General medical surgical
Hospital Type
Nongovernment, Not-for-profit
Hospital System
QHR

Data Provided by:
Caldwell Memorial Hospital
(828) 757-5100
321 Mulberry Street SW
Lenoir, NC
specialty
General medical surgical
Hospital Type
Nongovernment, Not-for-profit

Data Provided by:
Watauga Medical Center
(828) 262-4100
Deerfield Road
Boone, NC
Medicare Number
340051
Bed Count
105

Blowing Rock Hospital
(828) 295-3136
Chestnut Street
Blowing Rock, NC
Medicare Number
340045
Bed Count
100

Data Provided by:

Dealing with Secondary Headaches

Doctors define secondary headaches as those that result from a particular illness. Sometimes these illnesses are very serious and life threatening. Others may be benign but still cause pain and discomfort.

An easily identifiable secondary headache is the one accompanying a sinus infection. Your sinuses are behind the bridge of your nose, in each cheekbone and in your forehead bone. Allergies, infections and tumors cause sinuses to become inflamed. Infections can prevent sinus secretions from draining into the nose, as they need to do. The result is often a headache. Sinus headaches are usually accompanied by a fever.

Another type of secondary headache is the rebound headache. This results either from over use or improper use of medications. For example, if you use a decongestant because you think you have a sinus infection but you really don’t, then you might develop a headache from the decongestant.

If your headaches are so severe or so frequent that you take more of the medication than prescribed by the doctor or instructed on the label or take it more often, you can also get a rebound headache.

It is possible to acquire a dependency upon OTC or prescription medications. If this seems to be happening, you need to consult a physician. If you are resorting to acute treatments more than two times a week, you may be over medicating.

Headaches often result as side effects from use of drugs to treat high blood pressure and depression. Some dental problems also cause headaches.

More serious conditions which result in secondary headaches are: meningitis, cerebrovascular disease, infection, brain tumors, head trauma, diabetes, thyroid disease, temporomandibular joint pain, and glaucoma.

These are rare but there are certain symptoms, called ‘red flags’ which health care providers look for.

They include:

Headaches that get worse with movement and exercise.

Headaches in a person who already has certain medical problems such as high blood pressure, AIDS or cancer.

A sudden onset of severe headaches.

Headaches accompanied by other symptoms such as blurred vision, difficulty walking or talking, dizziness, loss of consciousness, high fever, stiff neck, nausea, disorientation, vomiting, pain in the eye, or a rash.

Headaches which begin following a head injury.

Headaches that always occur on the same side of the head. The location of a headache is an important indicator. Headaches that always occur on the same side of the head are most often secondary headaches.

Headaches reported by a patient with a family history of brain aneurysms.

Headaches that worsen over time

Headaches that are so severe as to interfere with one’s work or daily life.

Headaches that occur on a daily basis.

When these red flags are present, one should consult and be evaluated by a health care provider.

They can pinpoint the underlying medical condition by taking a patient history and ordering various tests such as special blood tests, CT scans, MRI and spinal taps.

The life threatening conditions, of which headaches are symptomatic, are rare. However, it is always wiser to play it safe and seek medical help whenever the ‘red flags’ are present.

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