Genes and Testicular Cancer Hickory NC

U.S. scientists say they've identified key gene variants tied to an increased risk of testicular cancer in Hickory. They said the findings are an important step toward understanding which men are at high risk for the disease.

Mobile Vet to Pet Service
(828) 446-9838
Serving Your Area
Granite Falls, NC

Data Provided by:
James Walter Goforth
(828) 431-4955
2972 N Center St
Hickory, NC
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Emergency Medicine

Data Provided by:
John Wilkinson
(828) 256-2112
2386 Springs Rd Ne
Hickory, NC
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided by:
William C Faltermayer
(828) 256-9853
2359 Springs Rd Ne
Hickory, NC
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided by:
Keith Allen Raymond
(828) 441-0888
4830 Glen Hollow Ln Ne
Hickory, NC
Specialty
Family Practice, Emergency Medicine

Data Provided by:
Lincoln Chiropractic
(704) 879-1994
108 Newbold St
Lincolnton, NC

Data Provided by:
Baxter Leonard
(828) 328-2231
24 2nd Ave Ne
Hickory, NC
Specialty
General Practice

Data Provided by:
Benjamin Warren Goodman
(828) 304-0840
2820 16th St Ne
Hickory, NC
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided by:
William L Young
(828) 328-2941
52 12th Ave Ne
Hickory, NC
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided by:
Patrick J Morgante
(828) 328-2941
52 12th Ave Ne
Hickory, NC
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Genes and Testicular Cancer

Provided By:

MONDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. scientists say they've identified key gene variants tied to an increased risk of testicular cancer.

They said the findings are an important step toward understanding which men are at high risk for the disease.

"Despite being quite heritable, there really have not been any clear genetic risk factors that can account for most cases of testicular cancer. These variants are the first striking genetic risk factors found for this disease to date," Dr. Katherine L. Nathanson, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and a specialist in medical genetics at the Abramson Cancer Center, said in a news release.

Nathanson and colleagues found that men with two copies of the common version of the c-KIT ligand (KITLG) gene are 4.5 times more likely to develop testicular cancer than men with two copies of the less common versions of the gene.

The researchers also found that men with two copies of the common version of variants next to another gene called sprouty 4 (SPRY4) are almost 1.5 times more likely to develop testicular cancer than men with two copies of the less common version of the gene.

The study appears online in the journal Nature Genetics.

Environmental exposure has been suspected as a factor in the growing incidence of testicular cancer, which is the most common cancer among young men, the study authors note. This study shows that genes also play a major role in a man's risk of developing the disease.

"This finding is quite different than those observed in many other genome-wide association studies," Nathanson said. "In most studies, the increased risk of disease is associated with the less common variant of the gene. In this case, it is the more common variant in Caucasians that is associated with risk. If you carry two copies of the less common variant you are probably at incredibly low risk."

More information

The American Cancer Society has more about testicular cancer.

SOURCE: University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, news release, May 31, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com