Health Tips for Cancer Survivors Greensboro NC

Treatment for cancer does not hamper cardiovascular fitness, regardless of the type of cancer, treatment, age or body mass index, a new U.S. study says. Researchers from Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, D.C., reached the conclusion after giving a three-minute step test to 49 diverse women in Greensboro who had recently survived cancer.

Edmund Joseph Le Bauer, MD
(336) 547-1752
PO Box 26201
Greensboro, NC
Specialties
Cardiology, Internal Medicine
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Male
Education
Medical School: Duke Univ Sch Of Med, Durham Nc 27710
Graduation Year: 1960
Hospital
Hospital: Moses H Cone Memorial Hospital, Greensboro, Nc
Group Practice: Lebauer Health Care

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Ajay Shantilal Kadakia, MD
(336) 574-2100
108 E Northwood St
Greensboro, NC
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Cardiology
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Male
Education
Medical School: Grant Med Coll, Univ Of Bombay, Bombay, Maharashtra, India
Graduation Year: 1979

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Dr.Jeffrey Katz
(336) 547-1700
1126 North Church Street #101
Greensboro, NC
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M
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Medical School: Univ Of Pa Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1976
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Cardiologist
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Hospital: Moses H Cone Memorial Hospital, Greensboro, Nc
Accepting New Patients: Yes
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5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

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Mohan N Harwani
(336) 273-3335
200 E Northwood St
Greensboro, NC
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Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease

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Helen Music Preston, MD
(336) 275-4096
301 E Wendover Ave Ste 310
Greensboro, NC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ky Coll Of Med, Lexington Ky 40536
Graduation Year: 1993
Hospital
Hospital: Moses H Cone Memorial Hospital, Greensboro, Nc; Wesley Long Community Hospital, Greensboro, Nc
Group Practice: Eagle Cardiology

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Ann Torian Bradsher, MD
(336) 273-7900
305 Isabel St
Greensboro, NC
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Cardiology
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Female
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ, Winston-Salem Nc 27157
Graduation Year: 1996

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Richard Alan Weintraub
(336) 273-7900
1331 N Elm St
Greensboro, NC
Specialty
Cardiology, Cardiovascular Disease

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Brian Sanders Crenshaw, MD
(336) 547-1715
520 N Elam Ave
Greensboro, NC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tn, Memphis, Coll Of Med, Memphis Tn 38163
Graduation Year: 1990

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Stewart Allan Schall, MD
(336) 832-8060
1200 N Elm St
Greensboro, NC
Specialties
Cardiology
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Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Pa Sch Of Med, Philadelphia Pa 19104
Graduation Year: 1964

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Philip Joseph Nahser
(336) 272-6133
1002 N Church St
Greensboro, NC
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Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease

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Health Tips for Cancer Survivors

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THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment for cancer does not hamper cardiovascular fitness, regardless of the type of cancer, treatment, age or body mass index, a new U.S. study says.

Researchers from Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, D.C., reached the conclusion after giving a three-minute step test to 49 diverse women who had recently survived cancer.

"What's really exciting to us was that we found that cardiovascular fitness was not affected by the expected culprits -- cancer treatment, type, duration or time since treatment," researcher Jennifer LeMoine, a fellow with training in exercise physiology at Georgetown University's Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, said in a news release from the university. "That isn't to say there aren't side effects of some treatments that may hinder physical activity, but when it comes to actual cardiovascular fitness as measured in our clinic, many of the standard treatments didn't have a role."

The results of the study were to be presented this week in Seattle at the annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine.

A third of the study participants said they lived sedentary lives, and the others described themselves as physically active. About 71 percent of the participants completed the step test, the researchers reported.

"We've modified an in-clinic cardiovascular assessment tool, the three-minute step test, with the goal of finding a test that can easily and quickly be performed in a physician's office," Dr. Priscilla A. Furth, a professor of oncology and medicine at Lombardi, said in the news release. "Having this kind of evaluation tool is critical for physicians, like me, who are interested in prescribing physical activity for this population."

More information

The American Cancer Society has more about staying active for life.

SOURCE: Georgetown University Medical Center, news release, May 28, 2009

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