Heat Therapy for Esophageal Cancer Mooresville NC

Radiofrequency ablation is an effective treatment for precancerous Barrett's esophagus, researchers have found. In people with Barrett's esophagus in Mooresville, repeated acid reflux causes cells that line the esophagus to be replaced by cells similar to those found in the intestine, according to background information provided in a news release. A small number of people with Barrett's esophagus develop a deadly form of cancer called esophageal adenocarcinoma.

Alternative Chiropractic: A Creating Wellness
(704) 353-7602
484-D Williamson Rd.
Mooresville, NC

Data Provided by:
Duncan Chiropractic
(704) 987-5050
19824 W Catawba Ave # E
Cornelius, NC

Data Provided by:
Modern Eye Care
(704) 792-2777
Vining St. NW
Concord, NC

Data Provided by:
Alissandro Roque Castillo
(704) 662-3627
478 Williamson Rd
Mooresville, NC
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided by:
John Lyle McGuinness
(704) 799-7811
170 Medical Park Rd
Mooresville, NC
Specialty
Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Uhrich Chiropractic
(704) 353-7529
816 Brawley School Rd # D
Mooresville, NC

Data Provided by:
Dr. Bruce Withers
(704) 489-2511
3273 N. Hwy 16
Denver, NC
Business
Foundation Chiropractic
Specialties
Chiropractic
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: For your convenience, we gladly file insurance for our patients.
Medicare Accepted: Yes
Accepts Uninsured Patients: Yes
Emergency Care: Yes

Doctor Information
Residency Training: 2 years clinical at Sherman College Health Center, Spartanburg, SC
Medical School: Life University College of Chiropractic and Sherman College of Straight Chiropractic, 2004
Additional Information
Awards: Past president of Sherman College Sacro Occipital Technique Club
Languages Spoken: English,Spanish

Data Provided by:
Bruce S Mather
(704) 316-1635
130 Plantation Ridge Dr
Mooresville, NC
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided by:
Marcus A Washington
(704) 660-9111
125 Days Inn Dr
Mooresville, NC
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided by:
James Arthur Benson
(704) 660-4166
171 Fairview Rd
Mooresville, NC
Specialty
Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Heat Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

Provided By:

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Radiofrequency ablation is an effective treatment for precancerous Barrett's esophagus, researchers have found.

In people with Barrett's esophagus, repeated acid reflux causes cells that line the esophagus to be replaced by cells similar to those found in the intestine, according to background information provided in a news release. A small number of people with Barrett's esophagus develop a deadly form of cancer called esophageal adenocarcinoma.

The new study included 127 people randomly selected to receive either radiofrequency ablation (RFA) -- which uses heat to destroy abnormal cells -- or a "sham" version of the procedure, to assess the effect on dysplasia, a more advanced stage of Barrett's esophagus in which the abnormal cells acquire precancerous traits.

Among patients with low-grade dysplasia, 90.5 percent of those who received RFA were dysplasia-free 12 months after treatment, compared with 22.7 percent of those in the sham therapy group. Of those with high-grade dysplasia, 81 percent had complete eradication of abnormal cells, compared with 19 percent of those in the sham treatment group, the researchers found.

Overall, 77.4 percent of patients treated with RFA had complete eradication of abnormal cells, compared with 2.3 percent of the sham treatment group. The study also found that 3.6 percent of those in the RFA group and 16.3 percent of those in the sham group had progression towards disease, while 1.2 percent of RFA patients and 9.3 percent of sham patients developed esophageal adenocarcinoma.

"These results show there is a substantial difference between treatment with radiofrequency ablation and a placebo or 'sham' treatment. It's a strongly positive finding," principal investigator Dr. Nicholas Shaheen, director of the Center for Esophageal Diseases and Swallowing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said in the news release.

The study, published in the May 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, received funding from the company that makes the radiofrequency ablation unit used in the study.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about Barrett's esophagus.

SOURCE: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, news release, May 27, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com